Arts and Entertainmant
  • Alan Harrington (d.1997 at 79) published his novel of male menopause "The Secret Swinger."
  • Arlo Guthrie wrote the song "Alice's Restaurant," and it became the anti-draft fight song.
  • The Beach Boys sang "Good Vibrations," and sales exceeded a million records.
  • The Beatles concluded their fourth American tour with their last public concert, at Candlestick Park in San Francisco.
  • The Beatles were attacked in Philippines after insulting Imelda Marcos.
  • The Blue Note jazz label of Alfred Lion was sold to Liberty Records. It was later transferred to EMI.
  • "Cabaret" was a musical hit on Broadway. It was based on Christopher Isherwood's "Goodbye to Berlin" in "Berlin Stories" and John Van Druten's "I Am a Camera. "
  • Chas Chandler, bass player for the Animals, spotted Jimi Hendrix playing at the Cafe Wha in New York and invited him to London. He later produced the first 2 Hendrix albums.
  • C.O. Sauer wrote his classic "The Early Spanish Main."
  • Cy Coleman composed the musical "Sweet Charity," a tale of the gals on Times Square.
  • DJ's screen records for hidden drug and satanic meaning
  • Dusty Springfield recorded "You Don't Have to Say You Love Me."
  • Edward Albee wrote his play "A Delicate Balance" which won him a Pulitzer Prize.
  • Edward Stewart (1938-1996) wrote his first novel: "Orpheus On Top." He went on to publish 11 more novels.
  • Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton star in "Who's Afraid Of Virginia Wolf"
  • Euell Gibbons wrote "Stalking the Healthful Herbs."
  • Frank Sinatra made a hit with "Strangers in the Night." The song won a Grammy as record of the year.
  • Frank Sinatra and Mia Farrow are wed in Las Vegas ceremony
  • George Rickey made his sculpture "Two Red Lines II." It was placed outside the Oakland Museum.
  • The Grateful Dead returned to Northern California from Los Angeles. They established a ranch in Novato and moved into a Victorian at 710 Haight St.
  • Hedda Hopper, American gossip columnist, died.
  • Heinlein published his novel "The Moon is a Harsh Mistress."
  • Jacqueline Susann (d.1974 at 56) authored the novel "Valley of the Dolls."
  • James Dickey (1923-1997) won the National Book Award for his poetry collection "Buckdancer's Choice."
  • James Goldman wrote his play "The Lion in Winter," set in 1183 England.
  • Jan Berry of the "Jan and Dean" duo was involved in a car crash that left him in a month-long coma.
  • Jean Shepherd (d.1999), radio raconteur, authored "In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash."
  • Jeff Hanna and Jimmie Fadden founded the "Nitty Gritty Dirt Band."
  • Jimi Hendrix popularizes the electric guitar
  • Long Time Favorite Buster Keaton Dies
  • "Mame" played with Angel Lansbury.
  • Margaret Walker Alexander, black author, wrote her novel "Jubilee." It was the story of the daughter of a slave and a white plantation owner.
  • The Metropolitan Opera opened its new opera house at New York's Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts
  • "Mission Impossible" began on TV. Greg Morris (1934-1996) played Barney Collier, the technical wizard. Its theme music was written by Lalo Schifrin.
  • Peter Garlake, British archeologist, wrote: "Islamic Architecture on the Coast of East Africa."
  • Professor Alan Heimert (d.1999 at 70) of Harvard published "Religion and the American Mind: From the Great Awakening to the Revolution." It had a significant impact on understanding the American culture of the 18th century.
  • Roy Lichtenstein created his work: "Blue Seascape."
  • Simon and Garfunkel sang "Scarborough Fair."
  • The sitcom "Family Affair" began on TV. It ran to 1971.
  • The "Star Trek" television series began and ran on NBC till 1969.
  • "Suggested for mature audiences" starts due to "Who's Afraid Of Virginia Wolf"
  • Tom Stoppard wrote his play "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead."
  • Truman Capote wrote his non-fiction novel "In Cold Blood." It was based on a 1959 family murder in Kansas. He spent 5 years reconstructing the lives and crimes of Dick Hickock and Perry Smith.
  • Virgil Thomson, composer and music critic, wrote his autobiography.
  • Walt Disney died
  • William T. Stearn published the first edition of his "Botanical Latin." It contained the history, grammar, syntax, terminology and vocabulary of botanical Latin and went to a 4th edition in 1995.
  • "Winchester Cathedral" by the New Vaudeville Band won the Grammy best contemporary recording category.
  • "The World of Jacques-Yves Cousteau" made its debut on American TV as a National Geographic Special.
  • The 1st annual Muscular Dystrophy Telethon, led by Jerry Lewis, was held.
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